Tag: Maritime shipping industry

News|Bunkerspot
Ship It Zero Calls Maersk’s 2040 Pledge a ‘Necessary Step’ Towards Zero Emissions Cargo Shipping
January 13, 2022 — Ship It Zero coalition members Stand.earth and Pacific Environment say Maersk’s decision to aim for net zero climate emissions by 2040 – 10 years earlier than its initial target date– is an ‘industry-leading commitment’ but they have expressed concern that the shipping giant’s 2030 goals rely on offsets.
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News|Mother Jones
For Some, Shipping Bottleneck Presages a Polluted Holiday Season
December 8, 2021 — Pandemic-related supply chain issues have slowed the flow of goods into American homes, even as the ports move to speed up operations. For many, that means delays on holiday gifts, but for locals like Chavez, who was diagnosed with asthma as a child and now works for the Coalition for Clean Air, the excessive pollution related to shipping and trucking congestion at the ports raises concerns about his health, and that of his community.
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News|Business Insider
The supply chain crisis is wreaking havoc on the environment as carbon emissions from ships and seaports reach the highest rate since 2008
December 3, 2021 — "The retail brands that fill our homes and lives with their products bear a direct responsibility both for the pollution that the maritime shipping in their supply chains creates and for taking the necessary actions to demand emissions reductions now and 100 per cent zero emissions shipping this decade," the report said.
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News|Lloyd's List
Focus on shippers and ocean carriers as US retail sales rise
December 1, 2021 — Amazon and Target have played an “outsized role” in the congestion at the US west coast ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, according to a study by the Ship It Zero Coalition, which is comprised of environmental and public health advocates, scientists, and shipping experts who are lobbying companies to “achieve zero-emissions shipping by 2030.”
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News|The Siasat Daily
Amazon, Target fueling port pollution, harming communities: Report
December 1, 2021 — According to the report by non-profit environmental groups Pacific Environment and Stand.earth, fossil-fueled cargo container ships have idled off the shores of the San Pedro Bay Ports for months, bringing higher levels of asthma and cancer-associated air pollutants, including particulate matter, nitrogen oxide, and sulfur oxide into the port-adjacent communities.
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News|Hellenic Shipping News
Groundbreaking new research uncovers close ties between polluting cargo carriers, major U.S. retailers
December 1, 2021 — New research released today by Ship It Zero coalition members Stand.earth and Pacific Environment takes an in-depth look at four major retail companies that import goods into the United States — Walmart, Target, Amazon, and IKEA — and maps their often-hidden relationships with the fossil-fueled cargo carriers they hire to transport their goods.
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News|NBC News
As 100 ships idle offshore, California communities see rise in toxic pollutants
October 28, 2021 — Together, the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach are responsible for about 40 percent of the country’s imports. Now, cargo ships are being forced to wait offshore for an average of 10 days as increased consumer spending, labor shortages, and other issues brought on or worsened by the Covid-19 pandemic continue to impact supply chains and cause slowdowns.
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Climate Advocates: Big Retail Fossil-Free Shipping Commitment Historic, But Too Weak
October 19, 2021 — Global retail giants including Amazon and IKEA today announced a landmark commitment to move their products off of fossil-fueled maritime cargo ships by 2040, but environmental organizations with the Ship It Zero coalition say the commitment is too weak to address the urgent climate and public health crises tied to the ocean shipping sector.
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News|Treehugger
These 15 US Retailers Have the Worst Cargo Shipping Footprint
July 27, 2021 — When Ikea announced 100% electric home delivery in certain cities and Amazon started working toward zero-emission deliveries, they both got a decent amount of credit. The same goes for Walmart installing electric vehicle chargers or Target’s embrace of circular design. Yet while these retailers might all be taking some substantive steps toward mitigating emissions, there’s still a sizable, ocean-going elephant in the room. And that elephant smells like bunker fuel.
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